CDC Disinfection Guidance for Bird Flu

Based on the current outbreaks of Avian Flu, The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has issued interim guidance on testing, specimen collection, and processing of patients with suspected infections with Novel Influenza A viruses with the potential to cause severe disease in humans. In this guidance the CDC is recommending that clinicians and public health personnel consider the possibility of infection in anyone with influenza-like illnesses (ILI), and acute respiratory infection (ARI), that has had contact with sick or dead birds, in the following categories, domestic poultry (e.g., chickens, turkeys, ducks), wild aquatic birds (e.g., ducks, geese, swans), and captive birds (e.g., falcons) that have had contact with wild aquatic birds. Within the CDC guidelines for environmental infection control throughout health-care facilities, the recommendations include disinfection of frequently touched surfaces and objects with an EPA disinfectant labeled to kill Influenza A.
How Does It Spread? The avian flu virus is present in the saliva, nasal secretions, and feces of infected birds. It will spread rapidly within a flock of poultry fowl. It will also spread to persons who are in close contact with such birds, such as workers and handlers. Transmission from person to person is possible though unusual. You cannot get the virus from eating properly cooked chicken. How can we Prevent Avian Flu? Preventing avian flu requires multiple measures. Sources of infection have to be eliminated and modes of transmission have to be checked. Sometimes, entire flocks of poultry birds have to be culled. Workers and handlers are required to wear personal protective equipment such as gloves, gowns, and face masks. Patients suspected to have contracted the virus are isolated from others. They are treated with certain antiviral medications. One such drug is oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is also recommended for people who have been in close contact with sick birds even though they haven’t developed any symptoms yet. How does Chlorine Dioxide get rid of Avian Flu? The CDC provides a number of guidelines for the control of avian influenza in health-care settings such as hospitals, nursing homes, and clinics. One of the recommendations is proper cleaning and sterilization of environmental surfaces. In the following lines, we want to explain to our audience why we believe chlorine dioxide is the best sterilizer for environmental surfaces, and therefore, an effective means of getting rid of avian flu.
Avian flu is viral in origin. So, for a sterilizer to be effective against it, it should be a virucide. A virucide is a chemical agent that can kill viruses. Chlorine dioxide is a potent virucide. It is effective against a range of viruses including influenza A virus which is the cause of avian flu. Cleaning and disinfecting environmental surfaces in health-care settings with chlorine dioxide ensures protection against this viral illness. In addition to health-care settings, its potent virucidal action makes chlorine dioxide a great choice for use as a surface sterilizer at poultry farms and egg ranches. Whether you are related to chicken or turkey farming, you must be well aware of the devastation that certain strains of bird flu can cause. Entire flocks may die in days or need to be culled if found to be infected. For businesses based around poultry, this can translate to financial disaster. Keeping your farms and ranches clean and disinfected with chlorine dioxide can protect you, your workers, and your fowl from avian flu. It can also save you from a costly outbreak.
Based on the current outbreaks of Avian Flu, The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has issued interim guidance on testing, specimen collection, and processing of patients with suspected infections with Novel Influenza A viruses with the potential to cause severe disease in humans. In this guidance the CDC is recommending that clinicians and public health personnel consider the possibility of infection in anyone with influenza-like illnesses (ILI), and acute respiratory infection (ARI), that has had contact with sick or dead birds, in the following categories, domestic poultry (e.g., chickens, turkeys, ducks), wild aquatic birds (e.g., ducks, geese, swans), and captive birds (e.g., falcons) that have had contact with wild aquatic birds. Within the CDC guidelines for environmental infection control throughout health-care facilities, the recommendations include disinfection of frequently touched surfaces and objects with an EPA disinfectant labeled to kill Influenza A. How Does It Spread? The avian flu virus is present in the saliva, nasal secretions, and feces of infected birds. It will spread rapidly within a flock of poultry fowl. It will also spread to persons who are in close contact with such birds, such as workers and handlers. Transmission from person to person is possible though unusual. You cannot get the virus from eating properly cooked chicken. How can we Prevent Avian Flu? Preventing avian flu requires multiple measures. Sources of infection have to be eliminated and modes of transmission have to be checked. Sometimes, entire flocks of poultry birds have to be culled. Workers and handlers are required to wear personal protective equipment such as gloves, gowns, and face masks. Patients suspected to have contracted the virus are isolated from others. They are treated with certain antiviral medications. One such drug is oseltamivir. Oseltamivir is also recommended for people who have been in close contact with sick birds even though they haven’t developed any symptoms yet. How does CLO2 get rid of Avian Flu? The CDC provides a number of guidelines for the control of avian influenza in health-care settings such as hospitals, nursing homes, and clinics. One of the recommendations is proper cleaning and sterilization of environmental surfaces. In the following lines, we want to explain to our audience why we believe chlorine dioxide is the best sterilizer for environmental surfaces, and therefore, an effective means of getting rid of avian flu.
Avian flu is viral in origin. So, for a sterilizer to be effective against it, it should be a virucide. A virucide is a chemical agent that can kill viruses. CLO2 is a potent virucide. It is effective against a range of viruses including influenza A virus which is the cause of avian flu. Cleaning and disinfecting environmental surfaces in health-care settings with chlorine dioxide ensures protection against this viral illness. In addition to health-care settings, its potent virucidal action makes CLO2 a great choice for use as a surface disinfecting agent at poultry farms and egg ranches. Whether you are related to chicken or turkey farming, you must be well aware of the devastation that certain strains of bird flu can cause. Entire flocks may die in days or need to be culled if found to be infected. For businesses based around poultry, this can translate to financial disaster. Keeping your farms and ranches clean and disinfected with chlorine dioxide can protect you, your workers, and your fowl from avian flu. It can also save you from a costly outbreak.